Hancock Park

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Our Californio forefathers referred to the smelly, seepy, black stuff we call tar as la brea.  So, it’s no wonder the 4,439-acre land grant encompassing the tar pits was called “Rancho La Brea.”  The Rancho’s deeds passed through the hands of the Rocha family and landed in the lap of lawyer, Henry Hancock, for a mere $20,000.  Nowadays, a single house in Hancock Park runs around $6.5 million!

It seems either gates or topography deliberately seclude most multi-million dollar homes in Los Angeles.  So, I think the most striking aspect of this area is its vulnerability.  It just rests, unguarded, smack in the middle of everything.  I suppose it’s a good thing 1200 of these homes were declared the Hancock Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone in 2006.  Though I should add that HPOZs are to protect homes from their own owners, not from trespassers.

Common features among these 1920’s homes are that they are all set 50 feet back from the street and many of them have side driveways with porte-cochères.  Stylistically, Hancock Park is a revival town with a focus the following revival styles: Tudor, English, Spanish Colonial, Mediterranean, Monterey, and American Colonial.  Above, I have highlighted the English Revival, Mediterranean Revival, and porte-cochères.

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Posted on December 7, 2011, in Hancock Park and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

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