Category Archives: Granada Hills

114 Deodar Trees

114 Deodar Trees114 Deodar TreesDeodar TreeDeodar TreeDeodar Tree

One day, Honi was walking down the street and saw a man planting a carob tree.  Honi said, “What are you planting that tree for?  You’ll die before it bears any fruit.”  The man responded, “Ahhh, yes, but my forefathers planted carob trees for me as I will plant them for my grandchildren.”

The story ends with Honi taking a 70-year nap, discovering fruit on the tree, meeting the appreciative grandchildren, and subsequently praying for death because the younger generation didn’t believe 70-year naps were possible.  Thankfully, the latter part of this tale is not relevant.

The relevant part is that sometimes, great people plant trees for future generations.  Men like John Orcutt.   In 1933, Orcutt planted these cedar trees along .75 miles of White Oak Ave. between San Jose St. and San Fernando Mission Blvd.  Nearly 80 years later, they tower over the street, transporting the onlooker to Pakistan.  After all, the Deodar Cedar is Pakistan’s national tree.

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Balboa Highlands

Eichler HomesEichler HomesEichler HomesEichler HomesEichler HomesEichler HomesEichler HomesEichler HomesEichler HomesEichler HomesEichler homeEichler Home

Often when we talk about a building, we talk about the architect.  This is not the case for the homes of the Balboa Highlands, which are most often referred to as “that Eichler tract in the Valley.”

A. Quincy Jones, Frederick Emmons, and Claude Oakland designed these modern, post-and-beam, indoor/outdoor homes.  The developer, Joseph Eichler, is acknowledged as the brains behind this operation because of his beloved developments up and down the state.  This development was completed in 1964 and gained Historical Preservation Overlay Zone status in 2010.

There are 3 types of houses in this development.  To the layman, we might call them the flat houses, the pentagonal houses, and the ones with the carports.  Since I’m no architectural historian, I’ll leave it to the layman.

 

 

Mission Peak

Newhall Pass

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