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Crestwood Hills

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This Brentwood canyon community started with cooperative aspirations.  An original vision wherein residents would share a bus to work was never realized.  This was not the only glitch in the cooperative design.  Only 160 of the 500 homes in the original plan were built.  60 homes were destroyed by wildfire in 1991.  Several homes have been lost to alterations.

Personally, if I lived in an A. Quincy Jones house, I would want to make sure it stayed the way he intended. It turns out I’m not alone in my sentiment.  Residents banded together and got 17 of the 33 remaining homes to be designated as historic-cultural monuments. Even if you’re not into modern architecture, the views from Crestwood Hills is still worth the trip.

For more info on the Mutual Housing Association, check here: http://crestwoodla.com/

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Balboa Highlands

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Often when we talk about a building, we talk about the architect.  This is not the case for the homes of the Balboa Highlands, which are most often referred to as “that Eichler tract in the Valley.”

A. Quincy Jones, Frederick Emmons, and Claude Oakland designed these modern, post-and-beam, indoor/outdoor homes.  The developer, Joseph Eichler, is acknowledged as the brains behind this operation because of his beloved developments up and down the state.  This development was completed in 1964 and gained Historical Preservation Overlay Zone status in 2010.

There are 3 types of houses in this development.  To the layman, we might call them the flat houses, the pentagonal houses, and the ones with the carports.  Since I’m no architectural historian, I’ll leave it to the layman.

 

 

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